Dish-washing machines

Abstract

Claims

1. A DISH-WASHING MACHINE COMPRISING A CABINET SUBDIVIDED TO PROVIDE A DOWNWARD WASHING RUN, AND UPWARD DRYING RUN AND A TRANSFER RUN BETWEEN THE BOTTOMS OF THE FIRST TWO RUNS, AN ENTRY OPENING AT THE TOP OF THE WASHING RUN, A DISCHARGE OPENING AT THE TOP OF THE DRYING RUN, A CONVEYOR ALONG EACH RUN, DRIVE MEANS FOR THE CONVEYOR, PROJECTIONS ON THE CONVEYOR, AT LEST ONE LOOSE BASKET FOR LOADING WITH ARTICLES TO BE WASHED, SUSPENSION MEANS ON THE BASKET FOR ENGAGEMENT BY THE PROJECTIONS OF THE CONVEYOR, HIGH PRESSURE SCRUBBING WATER JETS NEAR THE TOP OF THE WASHING RUN, WATER SPRAY JETS LOWER DOWN THE WASHING RUN, A RESERVOIR FOR SUPPLYING DETERGENT TO THE SPRAY JETS, RINSING WATER JETS IN THE WASHING RUN BELOW THE SPRAY JETS, FURTHER RINSING WATER JETS IN THE TRANSFER RUN, A WASTE OUTLET FOR DISPOSING OF DIRTY WATER, AND NOZZLES FOR DIRECTING HOT AIR INTO THE DRYING RUN.
p 4, 1967 M. w. THRING DISH-WASHING MACHINES Filed Feb. 16, 1965 United States Patent Office 3 ,3 i223 Q Patented Apr. 4, 1967 3,312,230 DISH-WASHING MACHINES Meredith Wooldridge Thring, Buckhurst Hill, England, assignor to Thrings Advanced Developments Limited Filed Feb. 16, 1965, Ser. No. 432,974 Claims priority, application Great Britain, Feb. 18, 1964, 8 Claims. (Cl. 13472) This invention relates to dish-washing machines particularly, though not exclusively, for domestic use and suitable for washing, rinsing, and drying charges of dishes, utensils, and cutlery of whatever miscellaneous character may be collected for cleaning at any one time. According to the present invention, a dish-washing machine comprises a downward washing run and an upward drying run, together with a transfer run between the bottoms of the first two runs, there being along each run a conveyor with projections to engage a loose basket for loading with articles to be washed so as to carry it at predetermined speed downwardly past washing jets in turn along the washing run and upwardly in a drying atmosphere in the drying run, and to transfer the basket from one of these runs to the other, there also being rinsing jets disposed to operate on the basket after it has passed the washing jets. By the use of high-pressure hot water from the washing jets and suitable application of detergent, with the jets disposed in number and direction to attack the whole width occupied by all articles in the basket, the progression of the basket, inserted at the top of the washing run, past the jets enables them to attack the whole surface of all the articles. Preferably, two sets of jets are disposed in turn along the washing run, first high-pressure scrubbing jets and next spray jets to apply detergent, so that forcible major cleaning by the first minimises the amount of detergent required for the final cleaning, by the next, and likewise the amount of rinsing. The rinsing jets may be disposed to operate on the basket both at the bottom of the washing run and also in the transfer run, again with spray jets to effect rinsing of the whole surface. This leaves the basket with the washed and rinsed articles to be subjected to hot air applied as an upward current to cover the whole surface of the articles throughout the drying run, to effect drying by the time the basket reaches the top of the drying run for removal. Conveniently, a single endless conveyor extends down the washing run, along the transfer run, and up the drying run, from whence it returns to the top of the washing run, and consists of a pair of belts guided round pulleys, with one belt at each side of each run and inwardly extending projections, the projections preferably being automatically engaged to and disengaged from the basket, so that once inserted in the machine the basket arrives at the discharge point without further attention, The drive for the conveyor may conveniently engage the belts in the return run between the drying run and the top of the working run, the belts preferably being provided with teeth for engagement by appropriately-shaped sprockets on a common driven shaft, thus maintaining the belts (and projections) in step with each other. One basket can follow another in succession, so that there may be more than one basket occupying different positions as they move through the machine in turn. The baskets are preferably adapted for stacking one on another, whether loaded or empty, both for storing purposes and for charging the entry with two or more loaded baskets, catch means being provided at the entry and being operable by the projections on the conveyor to release only the lowermost basket to the conveyor when the latter is ready to receive a further basket. Further catch means are preferably also provided to support each basket at the discharge point, until removed by hand or raised and supported by the next basket moving up the drying run, that next basket .in turn being supported by the further catch means possibly with one or more preceding baskets stacked on it and also awaiting removal. The or each basket may trip a cock before it reaches each jet Zone, so that the jets and sprays remain inactive except when a loaded basket is in position to be treated by them; and likewise the or each basket may trip the hot air supply appropriately in advance of its entry into the drying run. The drive for the conveyor and other control devices for the machine may be switched off automatically by the arrival of the basket, or the last basket, at the top of the drying run. However, in a machine for substantially continuous use (i.e., with one loaded basket closely followed by another), the bottom of each basket is preferably in the form of a collecting tray with a discharge spout adapted to deliver to a waste outlet water entering the basket from the high-pressure scrubbing jets only, the water from the detergent-water sprays and rinsing sprays being recirculatedpreferably after filteringto the high-pressure scrubbing jets and the detergent-water sprays, and makeup water (probably amounting to only a few gallons per hour) being supplied continuously, free of detergent, to the rinsing sprays. The make-up water may be supplied hot or may be heated-by a thermostatically controlled beaten-in the machine, and the recirculated water may be hotted up if desirable. Hot air blowing continuously over the contents of any basket retained at the discharge point merely serves to keep them warm or hot, as may prove convenient to the subsequent serving of hot food. An embodiment of the invention will now be described, by way of example only, with reference to the accompanying drawing, in which one side 1 of the washing machine is broken away to show a downward washing run 2 and an upward drying run 3 on opposite sides of a motor compartment 4 depending centrally from the top 5 of the machine, in which openings, 6, 7 having lids 8, 9 (shown removed and resting on the central top) afford respectively entry to the washing run and discharge from the drying run for baskets 10 for loading with articles (such as dishes, utensils and cutlery) to be washed. The nearer side wall 11A of the motor compartment 4 has been broken away to show (among other things) the motor 12 and worm reduction gearing 13A, 13B by which it drives a shaft 14 extending between and beyond both side walls 11A, 11B, where the shaft carries driving sprockets 15 (only one visible) for endless belts 16 (likewise only one visible) of quiet-running, hard-wearing, inextensible material provided with teeth 17 for engagement with the sprockets to maintain in step two series of spaced projections 18 extending inwardly (i.e., towards each other) from the belts. The belts are guided by pulleys 19 to pass down each side of the washing run 2, at each side of a transfer run 20 from the bottom of the washing run to the bottom of the drying run 3, and up each side of the drying run, and by pulleys 21 substantially to encircle the sprockets 15 in the return run from the top of the drying run to the top of the washing run. The projections 18 are of circular section, so that the baskets 10 can swing on them through the transfer run 20 by means of inverted V-shaped lugs 22 extending from each side and towards the top of each basket to support them on the projections. Just below each side of the opening 6 is a catch 23 (only one visible) with a bevelled end 24 lightly springloaded into the path of the projections 18 round the adjacent pulley 19, the catches 23 supporting a basket 10 inserted in the opening (and any basket or baskets stacked upon it) by the lugs 22, until a pair of projections, one on each belt, simultaneously engage the bevelled ends 24 and depress the catches, for the lugs 22 to slide down the bevelled ends on to the projections 18. Midway up the drying run 3, a spring-loaded catch 25 serves to support each basket 1% arriving at the discharge opening 7 (and any basket or baskets not previously removed and, therefore, becoming stacked upon it) upon release of a pair of projections 18 from beneath the lugs 22, as the belts 16 move round the adjacent pulleys 19. The baskets 10 may be provided with handles (not shown) at the top, to assist their insertion in the entry opening 6 and/ or removal from the discharge opening 7. At the top of the washin run 2, high-pressure scrubbing jets 26, one at the inside and one at the outside, direct powerful streams of water downwardly slightly, while lower down four series of spray jets 27, each series having two jets at the inside of the run and two at the outside, spray water generally horizontally, the top inner sprays being supplied with detergent drip-fed from a container 2.8. The jets 26, 27 in each series are coupled by pipes 29, all fed by a common supply pipe 30 from a multi-cylinder small-bore high-speed force pump 31 housed below a false bottom 32 of the machine and supplied with water through an intake 33 from below a filter 34, e.g., of fine nylon mesh. Rinsing sprays 35 above the transfer run 20 direct water generally downwardly and are supplied by a pipe 36 from a continuous-flow water heater 37, with a thermostat switch 38, the heater being supplied with water by a pipe 39 having a union 40 for connection to an external source. The pump 31 is driven by the motor 12 through a belt 41 and pulleys 42, the motor also driving a fan heater 43 (having an intake 44 with a filter 45) supplying hot air through a manifold 46 to nozzles 47 directed upwardly at the bottom of the outside and inside of the drying run 3. Each basket 18 has openwork sides, and an imperforate tray bottom 48 intended for collecting the major portion of the water from the scrubbing jets 26 (and any waste carried by it) and discharge it by means of a spout 49 through a vertical slot in a waste chamber 51 leading to a waste outlet pipe 52. The water from the secondary cleaning jets 27 and from the rinsing jets 35 is filtered by the mesh 34 and recirculated by the pump 31 to the scrubbing jets 26 and the secondary cleaning jets, so that the rinsing jets 35 receive only clean water supplied hot from the heater 37 and making up for water discharged through the outlet pipe 52. It will be appreciated that lesser details, such as bearings, pipe supports and connections within the machine, have been omitted for the sake of clarity, as have also the electrical connections for the motor 12 and heater 37. For the same reason, sections of the sheet metal which form the major part of the cabinet and motor compartment have been shown merely by thicker lines. What I claim is: 1. A dish-washing machine comprising a cabinet subdivided to provide a downward Washing run, an upward drying run and a transfer run between the bottoms of the first two runs, an entry opening at the top of the washing run, a discharge opening at the top of the drying run, a conveyor along each run, drive means for the conveyor, projections on the conveyor, at least one loose basket for loading with articles to be washed, suspension means on the basket for engagement by the projections of the conveyor, high pressure scrubbing water jets near the top of the washing run, water spray jets lower down the washing run, a reservoir for supplying detergent to the spray jets, rinsing water jets in the washing run below the spray jets, further rinsing water jets in the transfer run, a waste outlet f-or disposing of dirty water, and nozzles for directing hot air into the drying run. 2. A dish-washing machine comprising a cabinet subdivided to provide a downward washing run, an upward drying run and a transfer run between the bottoms of the first two runs, an entry opening at the top of the washing run, a discharge opening at the top of the drying run, a pair of endless belts, pulleys for guiding the belts one at each side of the washing run, the transfer run and the drying run, and back to the washing run through a return run, drive means engaging the belts in the return run, inward projections on the belts, at least one basket for loading with articles to be washed, lugs on the basket for engagement by the projections on the belts, high-pressure scrubbing water jets near the top of the washing run, water spray jets lower down the washing run, a reservoir for supplying detergent to the spray jets, rinsing water jets in the washing run below the spray jets, further rinsing water jets in the transfer run, a waste outlet for disposing of dirty water, and nozzles for directing hot air into the drying run. 3. A dish-washing machine comprising a cabinet subdivided to provide a downward washing run, an upward drying run and a transfer run between the bottoms of the first two runs, an entry opening at the top of the washing run, a discharge opening at the top of the drying run, a conveyor along each run, drive means for the conveyor, projections on the conveyor, a series of loose baskets for loading with articles to be washed and capable of stacking one on another, suspension means on each basket for engagement by the projections on the conveyor, catch means at the entry opening operable by the projections on the conveyor to release only the lowermost basket to the con veyor, further catch means for supporting each basket at the discharge opening, high-pressure scrubbing water jets near the top of the washing run, water spray jets lower down the washing run, a reservoir for supplying detergent to the water spray jets, rinsing Water jets mounted for operation after the cleaning water jets, a waste outlet for disposing of dirty water, and nozzles for directing hot air into the drying run. 4. A dish-washing machine comprising a cabinet subdivided to provide a downward washing run, an upward drying run and a transfer run between the bottoms of the first two runs, an entry opening at the top of the washing run, a discharge opening at the top of the drying run, a pair of endless belts, pulleys for guiding the belts one at each side of the washing run, the transfer run and the drying run, and back to the washing run through a return run, drive means engaging the belts in the return run, inward projections on the belts, a series of loose baskets for loading with articles to be washed and capable of stacking one on another, lugs on each basket for engagement by the projections on the belts, a spring-loaded catch at each side of the entry opening for engagement by the lugs on the lowermost basket and operable against the springloading by the projections on the belts, further catch means for supporting each basket at the discharge opening, highpressure scrubbing water jets near the top of the washing run, water spray jets lower down the washing run, a reservoir for supplying detergent to the spray jets, rinsing water jets mounted for operation after the cleaning water jets, a waste outlet for disposing of dirty water, and nozzles for directing hot air into the drying run. 5. A dish-washing machine as in claim 4, wherein the belts are provided with teeth for engagement by sprockets on a common driven shaft. 6. A dish-washing machine comprising a cabinet subdivided to provide a downward washing run, an upward drying run and a transfer run between the bottoms of the first two runs, an entry opening at the top of the washing run, a discharge opening at the top of the drying run, a pair of endless belts, pulleys for guiding the belts one at each side of the washing run, the transfer run and the drying run, and back to the washing run through a return run, drive means engaging the belts in the return run, inward projections on the belts, a series of loose baskets for loading with articles to be washed and capable of stacking one on another, a collecting tray with a discharge spout to one side forming the bottom of each basket, lugs on each basket for engagement by the projections on the belts, a spring-loaded Catch at each side of the entry openingfor engagement by the lugs on the lowermost basket and operable against the spring-loading by the projections on the belts, further catch means for supporting each basket at the discharge opening, high-pressure scrubbing water jets near the top of the washing run, a waste outlet lower down the washing run for disposing of dirty scrubbing water discharged by the spouts of the baskets, water spray jets below the waste outlet, a reservoir for supplying detergent to the spray jets, rinsing water jets mounted for operation after the cleaning water jets, a fresh water supply line for the rinsing jets, a filter extending across the lower part of the cabinet, a pump for recirculating water from below the filter to the scrubbing water jets and the water spray jets, and nozzles for directing hot air into the drying run. 7. A dish-washing machine as in claim 6, wherein a water heater is included in the machine as part of the fresh water supply line for the rinsing sprays. 8. A dish-washing machine as in claim 6, wherein a common motor drives the belts and the recirculating pump, and a fan heater for supplying hot air to the nozzles also driven by the same motor. References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,864,064 6/1932 Hall 13473 2,358,507 9/1944 Haberstump 13472 2,461,162 2/1949 Laird 134-72 3,002,731 10/1961 Gelfand et al l3473 X 3,132,655 5/1964 Anderson l3468 CHARLES A. WILLMUTH, Primary Examiner. R. L. BLEUTGE, Assistant Examiner.

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Patent Citations (5)

    Publication numberPublication dateAssigneeTitle
    US-1864064-AJune 21, 1932Automatic Food Machinery CorpDishwashing machine
    US-2358507-ASeptember 19, 1944Alfred H HaberstumpUtensil washing machine
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NO-Patent Citations (0)

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Cited By (2)

    Publication numberPublication dateAssigneeTitle
    US-2013104941-A1May 02, 2013Su-Liu LiuVertical Dish Washing Machine
    US-7089768-B2August 15, 2006Bsh Bosch Und Siemens Hausgeraete GmbhWashing machine with conveyor device