Method of forming a lighting and transmission line pole

Abstract

Claims

Jan. 30, 1968 P. A. MILLERBERND 3, METHOD OF FORMING A LIGHTING AND TRANSMISSION LINE POLE- Filed Sept. 15, 1965 Z /Q MENTOR (2)14. M/u. ERB-ERND ORNEY United States Patent Ofifice 3,355,778 Patented Jan. 30, 1968 3,365,778 METHOD OF FORMING A LIGHTING AND TRANSMISSION LINE POLE Paul A. Millerbernd, Winsted, Minn. 55395 Filed Sept. 15, 1965, Ser. No. 487,412 Claims. (Cl. 29-155) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE The present invention is for a method of forming light or transmission line posts having a tapered base for stability. The method is adaptable to octagonal, cylindrical, square or otherwise shaped tubular poles. The pole is slit diametrically to divide the base portion of the pole into four angularly spaced sections preferably of similar cross-section. The four sections are bent outwardly in a direction radially from the pole axis, forming triangular apertures between the sections. Generally triangular gusset plates are marginally secured to the substantially co-planar edges of the sections on opposite sides of the apertures. This invention relates to an improvement in a method of forming a lighting and transmission line pole, and deals particularly with a method of enlarging the base portion of the pole to render it more stable. Light poles and transmission line poles are oftentimes constructed of tubular metal construction used in great volume. One of the biggest difliculties experienced with poles of this type lies in the provision of an adequate support for anchoring the lower end of the pole. In many cases housings are provided for the lower ends of the pole so as to provide an increased bearing area. It is a purpose of the present invention to provide a simple and inexpensive method of forming the lower end of the pole so as to render it more stable. Poles of the type in question may vary in cross-section. Many such poles are of octagonal cross-section. While the drawings show the preferred form of construction as being of octagonal, hexagonal or other polygonal form, the pole may also be of other shape, such as a cylindrical form or rectangular form, and certain of the figures of the drawings show poles of this type. In view of the fact that poles of the type in question are usually awkward to handle due to their length, difficulty is experienced in working the metal so as to deform the lower end of the pole into a tapered shape. However, it has been formed that by splitting the pole longitudinally at one end, the portions of the pole between the slots may be bent into tapered form with comparative ease. When the slit portion of the pole is bent into tapered form, the slots at the lower end of the pole form triangular openings. The generally triangular gusset plates are then welded over the openings to form a lower end on the pole which is generally frusto-conical or frustopyramidal in form. A feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a method of forming a pole base which not only stabilizes the lower end of the pole, but also improves the appearance thereof. The generally triangular gusset plates which are welded to the outer surface of the pole form an attractive decoration for the pole, increasing the value of the pole from an apparent standpoint as well as from a structural standpoint. These and other objects and novel features of the present invention will be more clearly and fully set forth in the following specification and claims: In the drawings forming a part of the specification; FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view of the lower end of a light and transmission line pole after the lower end thereof has been reinforced. FIGURE 2 is a side elevational view of the pole after the first step of formation thereof. FIGURE 3 is a horizontal sectional view through the pole, the position of the section being indicated by the line 3-3 of FIGURE 2. FIGURE 4 is a side elevational view of the lower end of the pole after a portion of the method is completed. FIGURE 5 is a horizontal sectional view through the pole, the position of the section being indicated by the line 5-5 of FIGURE 1. FIGURE 6 is a bottom plan view of a modified form of pole. FIGURE 7 is a view similar to FIGURE 5 showing the pole of FIGURE 61 after the base portion has been formed. FIGURE 8 is a View similar to FIGURES 5 and 7 showing the base portion of a modified form of pole. In view of the fact that light and transmission poles are often of octagonal cross-section, such a structure is shown in FIGURES 1 through 5 of the drawings. FIGURES 2 and 3 of the drawings disclose an octagonally-shaped lower pole end. The first step of the method is to split the lower end of the pole 1i) longitudinally from the lower end thereof. In the particular arrangement illustrated, the lower end of the pole 10 has alternate surfaces slit as indicated at 11. The slits are shown midway between the vertical edges such as 12 of the sides 13, alternate of the sides being slit. The slits 11 are preferably of the same length on all of the faces. If a greater degree of spread is desired from that which can be accomplished by slitting alternate sides 13, each of the 8 sides may be slit if preferred. On the other hand, if the strain upon the pole is mainly in one direction, two opposite sides of the pole may be slit, and the remaining sides may remain intact. The arrangement illustrated is usually preferred. After the sides 13 have been slit as has been indicated at 11, the lower end of the pole is bent into frusto-pyramidal form, the unslit sides being bent outwardly in a radial direction in a manner to bend the lower end of the pole so that the slits 11 become triangular in form, the width of the slits gradually increasing to the bottom of the pole. Care is taken to bend all of the sections between the slits to the same extent so that the axis of the base portion of the pole remains co-axial with the axis of the body of the pole. When the pole has been bent into the shape illustrated in FIGURE 4 of the drawings, are generally triangular gusset plates 14 are marginally welded to the pole on opposite sides of the inverted V-shaped slit 15 which was originally the straight slit 11. The welding of the gusset plates 14 to overlie the slits 15 materially strengthen the lower end of the pole due to the added metal welded to the pole. The lower end of the pole is obviously stabilized by the formation of the base portion into a frusto-pyramidal shape. FIGURES 6 and 7 of the drawings show the same method used in conjunction with a cylindrical pole. The cylindrical pole 16 is longitudinally slit as indicated at 17, the slits 17 being arranged at degree intervals in the arrangement illustrated. The lower end of the pole 16 is bent into a substantially frusto-conical form although the portion of the pole on opposite sides of each slit 17 remain substantially in a common plane. As a result, the floor portions are of the 90 degree segments rather than being of truly frusto-conical form. The lower end of the pole has been completed by welding the generally triangular gusset plates 19 overlapping the edges of the segments such as 20 on opposite sides of 3 the slits 17. As'is evident from FIGURE 7 of the drawings, the slits 17 generally become triangular apertures 21 by the spreading of the lower end of the pole. FIGURE 8 of the drawings shows a square pole 22 having a square section as' indicated. The same method is followed, the lower end of the pole being longitudinally slit, the slits being located at the transverse centerline of each of the sides 23. When the lower end of the pole is bent into frusto-trapezoidal form, the slits become generally triangular apertures 24, there being one such aperture in each of the sides 23. The lower end of the pole is completed by welding a generally triangular gusset plate 25 to each side of the pole to overlie the triangular aperture and to form a closure therefore. The method described has a distinct advantage over shaping the lower end of the tapered pole into tapered form in any other manner with which I am familiar. The enlargement of the pole end by the use of forming'dies tends to stretch the metal and to weaken it whereas, with the present method, the lower end is actually substantially strengthened. At the same time, the operation can be accomplished much more easily and with much lighter equipment than is necessary to enlarge the lower end of the pole in other ways. - It will be noted that in each case, the lower end of the pole is slit along diametrically opposed lines, the slits being arranged and planes through the axis of the pole. Furthermore, in all cases, the base portion of the pole remains co-axial with the body of the pole. In accordance with the patent statutes, I have described the principles of construction and operation of my improvement in method of forming a lighting and transmission line pole, and while I have endeavored to set forth the'best embodiment thereof, I desire to have it understood that changes may be made within the scope of the following claims without departing from the spirit of my invention. I claim: a 1. A'method of forming a light and transmission line pole structure from an elongated hollow tubular metal pole, the method including the steps of: slitting one end of the pole along diametrically opposed slits of substantially equal length which are equally angularly spaced to provide four sections of similar cross-sectional shape, bending the sections radially from the axis of the pole without materially changing the cross-sectional shape thereof, the sections diverging from the inner ends of the slots to the end of the pole and producing triangular apertures of substantially equaltsize between said apertures, and securing two marginal edges of triangular gusset plates to the sections along opposite sides of said triangular apertures. 2. A method of forming a light and transmission line pole structure from an elongated hollow tubular metal pole and a series of similar triangular gusset plates, including the steps of: slitting one end of the pole along diametrically opposed slits of substantially equal length which are equally angularly spaced to provide four sections of similar cross-sectional shape, 7 V bending the sections radially from the axis of the pole without materially changing the cross-sectional shape thereof, the sections diverging from the inner ends of the slots to the end of the pole and producing triangular apertures of substantially equal size between said apertures, and said apertures being similar in shape to the outline shape of the'gusset plates, and securing two marginal edges of the gusset plates to the sections along opposite edges of said triangular apertures. 3. The method of claim 2 and in which the pole is of octagonal section and in which the slits are in alternate sides of the pole. 4. The structure of claim 2 and in which the pole is of circular section. a 5. The structure of claim 2 and in which the pole is 7 square in section. References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,215,061 2/1917 Rice et al. 29155 1,877,583 9/1932 Pfaif 29726 2,418,312 4/ 1947 Michelman 29-477 3,263,302 8/1966 Handley 29l55 1,722,671 7/1929 Lingo 29-155 45 THOMAS H. EAGER, Primary Examiner.

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Patent Citations (5)

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    US-1215061-AFebruary 06, 1917Cyrus W Rice, Charles W DakeProcess of forming expanded reticulated constructions.
    US-1722671-AJuly 30, 1929John E Lingo & Son IncMethod of making columns
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    FR-2404088-A1April 20, 1979Petitjean & CoPoteau notamment pour l'eclairage public
    US-3571991-AMarch 23, 1971Anderson Electric CorpMetal pole
    US-9655416-B1May 23, 2017Dougan H. ClarkeCrank handle positioning assembly for an umbrella